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Book Proposal for SO YOU SAY YOU’RE STRAIGHT: The one in five hidden homosexual heterosexuals

SO YOU SAY YOU’RE STRAIGHT: The one in five hidden homosexual heterosexuals  by the late Dr Neil McConaghy book proposal placed here on StraightGuise.com with permission by the author’s daughter, Dr. Finola McConaghy.

 

Contact Dr. Finola McConaghy at the address and phone below:

 

Dr. Finola McConaghy, Ph.D.
281 Cabbage Tree Rd.
Grose Vale NSW 2753
AUSTRALIA
Phone 0427 427 477

finola.mcconaghy@naturevet.com.au

 

 

All rights reserved.

 

 

Background

This manuscript was prepared by Dr. Neil McConaghy before his death in May 2005.  Dr. McConaghy retired as an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New South Wales in 1992.  He was working on the manuscript in the years prior to his death, which is now near completion.  Dr. McConaghy’s intention in writing the book was to broaden understanding of the diversity in human sexuality within the academic and lay population.

 

A group of interested individuals, including Dr. McConaghy’s daughter and several of his former students and colleagues are keen to see the manuscript published.  There is general agreement amongst the group members that the manuscript may need significant editing before it would be in a publishable form.   In particular, there is concern that the manuscript is overly dense and academic in style and repetitive in some areas, reflecting its status as a working draft at the time of Dr. McConaghy’s death.  The final chapter of the book is currently unwritten, though material from previous work is available that would complete this chapter.  The group has sufficient expertise and eagerness to edit the text, though advice from a publisher is sought.  The group consists of:

 

Dr. Finola McConaghy BVSc, DipVetClinStud, PhD

Technical Services Manager, Nature Vet Pty Ltd

 

Prof. Stanley Catts, MD, FRANZCP, PhD

Professor of Hospital and Community Psychiatry, University of Queensland.

 

Dr. Michael Armstrong MD, FRC Psych

Clinical Psychiatrist

 

Dr. Anna Lee MBBS, FRANZCP

Clinical Psychiatrist
Dr. Kevin Vaughan MBBS, FRANZCP

Clinical Psychiatrist

 

 

Synopsis

It is a little-known fact that the majority of people in the community who experience homosexual feelings are predominately heterosexual in feelings and sexual behaviour and identify as heterosexual.  Studies to date suggest that as much as 17 percent of the population could be described in this way.  However, this group remain hidden in the majority of studies, which continue to examine sexual behaviour within the restrictive categories of homosexual, heterosexual, and bisexual.

 

This book reflects on Alfred Kinsey’s contribution to the understanding of the continuum of human sexuality and examines subsequent evidence to support the need for a more inclusive approach to studying sexuality.  The author explores the reasons why academics and the wider community continue to view human sexuality in clearly differentiated categories of homosexual, heterosexual, and bisexual, half a century after Kinsey’s seminal publication and despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.  In particular, the author explores the association between homosexuality and effeminicity in men and butchness in women in perpetuating this dichotomous view of sexuality.

 

The concept of the ‘homosexual-heterosexual’ is introduced to broaden contemporary view of sexuality to be more inclusive of those with some homosexual but predominant heterosexual feelings and behaviours.  It is believed that the wider recognition of this group is necessary for a full appreciation of human sexuality as well as wider concepts such as love, attachment formation, and parenting.

 

The author examines the prevalence and course of homosexual behaviour across the lifespan.  Controversially, the author re-examines theories about the causes of homosexuality and whether there is a role for the treatment for homosexual feelings and behaviours in contemporary society.

 

Please find the Introduction and the first two chapters attached, in their original form.

 

Length

The current length of the book is 100,000 words.  There is no specific word count favoured by the group and we would appreciate advice on this matter before editing the manuscript.

 

Audience

The book is intended for a general academic audience.   We expect that the book will have appeal to those with an interest in the social and behavioural sciences and medicine, particularly those with a specific interest in human sexuality.

 

Competing Titles

 

The group can find no titles which compete directly with this manuscript.

 

Most contemporary publications on the subject of homosexuality focus on personal accounts and socio-political commentary.  In contrast, this book provides an empirical perspective on the prevalence, nature, and course of homosexuality in the community, with a particular interest in homosexual behaviour among individuals who identify as heterosexual.  Very few books on homosexuality make mention of this subset of the population, let along examine it in any detail.

 

The main strength of this manuscript is that it makes a strong and unique argument for a broader understanding of homosexual behaviour from an evidence-based perspective.  A further strength, in terms of publication, is that it contains some controversial issues, such as a re-examination of the prevalence and nature of homosexual behaviour and the role of treatment in contemporary society.

 

The group feels that the main weakness of the manuscript at the moment is its dense and overly academic style, which makes the material less accessible than desirable.

 

Author CV

Nathaniel McConaghy held the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from the University of Queensland and Doctor of Medicine from the University of Melbourne.  He was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science by the University of New South Wales in 1990 and title of Visiting Professor in 1992.

 

He is the author of over 150 peer reviewed articles and 30 books and chapters.

 

Academic and Personal Qualifications

M.B., B.S., University of Queensland, 1950

Diploma of Psychological Medicine, University of Melbourne, 1954

B.Sc., University of Melbourne, 1954

M.D., University of Melbourne, 1965

Fellow, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.

Foundation Fellow, International Academy of Sex Research

Honorary Member, Polish Academy

D.Sc., University of New South Wales, 1990

 

Academic and Personal Qualifications

1951: Resident medical Officer, Brisbane General Hospital, Queensland

1952: Medical Officer, Mental Hygiene Department, Victoria

1954: Senior Medical Officer, Mental Hygiene Department, Victoria

1955: Physician in Psychiatry, Crease Clinic, Vancouver, B. C., Canada

1956: Senior House Officer, Maudsley Hospital, London

1956: Training Scholarship, Electroencephalography Department, Maudsley Hospital, London

1957: Senior House Medical Officer St. Ebba’s Hospital, Epson, England

1959: Acting Senior Lecturer, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne

1961: Research Scholar, Department of Psychiatry, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne

1964: Lecturer, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales

1965: Senior Lecturer, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales

1970: Associate Professor, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales

1992: Visiting Professor, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales

 

A detailed curriculum vitae can be provided on request.

 

 

Table of Contents

The manuscript currently has the following table of contents:

 

Introduction…………………………………………….. 3

 

Chapter 1.  Academic non-acknowledgement of Kinsey’s recommendation to reject the false homosexual/heterosexual dichotomy: Need for term homosexual heterosexual”?………………………………………….7

 

Exclusion of the homosexual heterosexuals from thinking about homosexuality………………………………………. 11

Non-anonymous studies by sex researchers ignored Kinsey’s findings………………………………………………… 12

Studies employing anonymous questionnaires supported Kinsey’s findings………………………………………………… 13

Non-anonymous studies continue to ignore the homosexual heterosexuals………………………………………… 15

Careful evaluation given the sexual orientation of laboratory animals, but not human subjects……………………………………… 17

Rarity of exclusive homosexuality in humans….19

Modifications of the Kinsey Scale……………… 20

Homosexual heterosexuals found in some non-anonymous representative population studies…………………………………… 22

The need for anonymous questioning in studying sexual orientation……………………………………………… 24

Reduction in homosexual behavior and feelings with age in the predominantly heterosexual………………………. 25

Reduction in heterosexual behavior with age in the predominantly homosexual…………………………………………… 26

How do homosexual heterosexuals identify?… 27

Who identify as bisexual?…………………………. 28

Is the resistance to recognition of homosexual heterosexuals due to gay activism?……………………………………………….. 30

Continued acceptance by sexological science of the gay-straight dichotomy……………………………………………… 33

Was Evelyn Waugh a homosexual heterosexual?…………………………………………. 34

 

Chapter 2.  Sissiness, tomboyishness, effeminacy, butchness and the homosexual heterosexuals… 41

 

Historical awareness of an association of opposite sex-linked behaviors and homosexuality…………………………………………. 44

Awareness of an association of homosexuality and opposite sex-linked behaviors in the early psychiatric literature  ……54

The “fuzzy” concepts of sissiness, tomboyism, effeminacy, and butchness………………………………………………. 54

Inconsistent scientific recognition of the association of opposite sex-linked behaviors and homosexuality        ……………… 57

Research investigating the presence of milder opposite sex-linked behaviors in the childhood of identified  homosexuals  …  60

Homosexual heterosexuals show opposite sex-linked behaviors………………………………………………. 61

Opposite sexual identity and homosexuality: transsexualism…………………………………………. 64

Sexual identity becomes gender identity and transsexualism becomes gender identity disorder………………………………………. 67

Continued controversy as to whether gender identity is dimensional: transvestism……………………………………………. 73

Effeminacy and homosexuality in adult men: drag queens…………………………………………………… 74

Masculinity-Femininity and androgyny………….. 76

Masculine and feminine sex roles and sexual orientation………………………………………………..79

Sex roles, sex-linked behaviors and sexual orientation……………………………………………… .80

 

Chapter 3.   Theories of causes of sexual orientation and the homosexual heterosexuals……………. 83

 

Psychosocial theories fail to account for homosexual heterosexuality…………………………………………. 84

Psychoanalytic theories: parental relationships…………………………………………. 85

Learning theories: conditioning…………………. 87

Social learning theories…………………………… 90

Social constructionist theories………………….. 92

Homosexuality: a disposition or a temporary aberration……………………………………………. 94

Sexual scripts………………………………………. 100

Biological theories account for homosexual heterosexuality…………………………………………. 103

Genetic Factors……………………………………. 104

Homosexuality and evolution…………………… 110

Sex Hormone Influences………………………… 115

Hormonal factors versus rearing in determining sexual identity and orientation……………………………………………. 128

Relation of homosexual feelings and behaviors………………………………………………… 145

Sexual orientation as choice of sex of attachment or bonding partners: social and biological factors…………………………………. 147

 

Chapter 4.  Why homosexual heterosexuals conceal their homosexual feelings: homophobia, biphobia and sissyphobia. 156

 

Homosexual behavior in Ancient Greece and Rome…………………………………………………………. 156

Pederasty and homosexual heterosexuals……………………………………………. 157

The nature of homosexual activity in pederasty…………………………………………………. 161

Negative attitudes to men who adopted a passive role in anal intercourse: sissiphobia……………………………………………….. 180

Identification of the passive role and effeminacy: sissyphobia………………………………………………..181

Prevalence of male homosexuality in classical Athens…………………………………………………….. 185

Homosexuality in pre-Christian Rome………………………………………………………….. 187

Is homosexuality unnatural?……………………………… 207

Homophobia concerning animal behavior……………. 212

Tolerance of homosexuality in the Post-Roman Middle Ages in Europe…………………………………………………………. 215

Intolerance of homosexuality from the late Middle Ages…………………………………………………………….. 221

Increase in intolerance of homosexuality in the Renaissance…………………………………………………… 230

Decriminalization of consenting homosexuality…………………………………………………. 243

Contemporary persistence of homophobia and sissiphobia and biphobia………………………………………………………… 247

Theological responsibility for homophobia…………………………………………………… 247

 

Chapter 5.  Psychological health and homosexuality.   Is there a role for treatment of homosexual feelings?

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